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SVP hosts presentation on dating and relationships

Each Monday, Students for Violence Prevention (SVP) has hosted a series talking about how to build healthy relationships. This week’s topic was covering healthy romantic and dating relationships.  

“There is a lot more information out about dating relationships, but it’s still something that is so personal that it is really hard for people to connect what they need to be doing or how to go about certain things,” said Megan Woodfield, graduate student in psychology and organizer of the events. “This week in group, we went over dating relationships and touched on a lot of points like how to have effective communication in regards of conflict because that was kind of a big contention area for people, how to talk to your friends if you’re seeing unhealthy dynamics in their relationships, and then just what qualities you should be looking for in a healthy relationship and what makes it healthy and unhealthy.” 

Grace Perkins, sophomore in elementary education and member of SVP, said her biggest takeaway from this week was how to identify the healthy and toxic characteristics she has had in previous relationships, and how to manage conflicts moving forward.  

“Just learning what I want in a relationship and getting to see actual traits helps me to visualize having that in someone,” said Perkins. “I have some conflicts in my (past) relationships and I think this has helped me understand why (problems) arise and how I can diffuse them in a better way. It helps you become self-reflective and once you get there with someone, you can tell them what you expect.” 

Khadija Ceesay, sophomore in communications, said it is important to have events like this on campus to help students understand themselves and others around them better. 

“It has helped me to repair a friendship and understand my partner’s feelings much better and how to give her the love and care she needs,” Ceesay said. “I really enjoy these events because there’s so many people, myself included, that are too scared to ask for help or guidance. This makes it easier for them to ask specific questions related to their problems.” 

Woodfield also said she hopes that even if it is just one thing that resonates with someone during group, the series would be worth it. 

“If anything from this group can help someone go into (a relationship) with a better mindset, or acknowledge work that they need to be doing, or identify a situation where they didn’t deserve to be treated the way they were treated, then I feel like this would be successful,” Woodfield said. 

“It is very beneficial to get to know yourself better and really realize that you have a say in who you let into your life,” Perkins said. “You have a say in what you deserve and want in a relationship.” 

Next Monday at 5 p.m., Megan Woodfield will be diving into the dynamics of family relationships. This event will be held upstairs in the Overman Student Center. For more information about SVP or future events, please visit Gorilla Engage or contact them via email (svp@pittstate.edu).  

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