Soccer fans express anger over betting scandal

Michael Bauer | Collegio writer st popular sport in the world, but now it is tarnished by one of the biggest sports scandals in history. On Monday, Feb. 4, a European investigative firm known as Europol reported that an Asia-based crime syndicate had fixed a total of 380 soccer matches. These games included club matches and qualifiers for the world’s biggest competition, the World Cup. About $21.7 million had been bet on matches by criminals, yielding a $10.8 million profit, with bribes being shelled out to the referees to throw games. For those who do not follow soccer, this crisis is comparable to other sporting controversies seen in the United States such as the Black…

ISA hosts mini World Cup

Pedro Lopes chips toward teammates in hopes of setting up a goal for Brazil's team.

Jared Evans | Collegio Reporter Early Saturday morning cheers erupted from the stands in a half-dozen different languages as the “Brazil Dream” team scored its first goal against South Korea’s “Gangnam Style” at the annual International Student Association soccer tournament. “It was great to see the amount of people here in the middle of the United States that enjoy soccer,” said David Campuzano, undecided freshman. “Especially since most of us here are not originally from this country.” Campuzano, who played for the Paraguay team, said that he enjoyed the event because it brought people of many nationalities and cultures together. “It’s like our own little version of the World Cup, but it’s not as serious…