Poet professor shares his wealth of words

Casey Matlock | reporter Stephen Meats didn’t decide what to read from his book “Dark Dove Descending” until a few minutes before his fiction reading on Wednesday, Sept. 5, in the Governors Room of Overman Student Center. “I wanted to offer a wide variety and started with the title poem to help the audience understand the theme of the book,” Meats, professor of English said, “and along with that provide something conventional, surrealist and in between.” The next pieces read were a poem called “Night Sounds,” which Meats says was inspired by his love of birds, and “The Baseball Mitt,” which Meats said he read to appeal to the athletes in the audience. “I thought…

Just Write

Poet tells students to do what they love Tyler Breedlover | reporter After taking a 20-year hiatus, poet Paul Dickey returned to publishing his work in 2003, and he says he has a simple reason why. “It is necessary for me personally to feel comfortable with myself,” he said. “It’s who I am. If I didn’t write, I would be somebody else.” Dickey visited campus on Thursday, Feb. 28, for the Distinguished Visiting Writer’s Series. He read works from two books of poetry in a crowded Governors Room. According to the Nebraska Center for Writers, Dickey obtained his master’s degree from Indiana University, and then transferred to Omaha, Neb., in 1986 where he was employed…

Poet ‘X’PLICIT’ kicks off Black History Month

Poet Brandon 'X'PLICIT interacts with the audience during his poetry session Feb. 4 in the U club

Joud Bayeh | reporter Black History Month at Pittsburg State opened in explicitly poetic fashion with the talents of spoken word artist Brandon Thorton. The Black Students Association (BSA) and the Office of Student Diversity invited Thorton, also known as X’PLICIT, to the University Club on Feb. 4. This is Thorton’s second performance at the university. He opened the schedule of Black History Month events last year. His act began with a rendition of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” the theme song from the namesake Will Smith sitcom. Thorton moved to a deeper topic by reciting his own poems about social problems like poverty and racism. “Black people are the No. 1 consumer but the…