PittCulture

  • Look of the Week

    Closet a ‘classy’ resource for students

    Going to the Career Closet, we had in mind an outfit that would be business appropriate but fashionable. We chose an outfit that included a black dress with a hot pink blazer to go over it.

    Haley Kanak, junior, and Abbey Prince, sophomore, are majors in fashion merchandising.

    Haley Kanak, junior, and Abbey Prince, sophomore, are majors in fashion merchandising.

    We enjoyed this outfit because the black dress was classy and length-appropriate and the pink blazer added a touch of style.
    We also would pair this outfit with a pair of black close-toed shoes to continue the classy business look. The Career Closet is a resource that can benefit students because one outfit is free to students once a semester. As fashion merchandising students, we are learning how to construct and put together a professional appearance for something such as a job interview and how fashion is used every day.
    Each of the looks featured in this article are available in the Career Clothes Closet, located on the second floor of Horace Mann. All clothing in the Career Clothes Closet is free to all students. The Look of the Week is brought to you by the partnership between the Office of Career Services, the department of Family and Consumer Sciences fashion merchandising program, and the Collegio. 
    Haley Kanak, junior, and Abbey Prince, sophomore, are majors in fashion merchandising.

  • A walk among the art

    | Charles A. Ault reporter |

    The sounds of a bluegrass band filled the downtown streets of Pittsburg during the quarterly Art Walk on Friday, April 24.
    “It’s cool to see the community get together and kind of celebrate and support all of the art and the art majors who are at Pitt State,” said Kyle Sooter, junior in manufacturing engineering.
    Along with the band, attendees were also able to purchase works from the artists themselves. Some artists even set up temporary studios and painted right there on Broadway.
    The Art Walk was also an opportunity for PSU’s Art Department to interact with the Pittsburg community.
    “It gives us an opportunity in the Art Department to kind of get out in the community so people see what we do,” said James Oliver, professor of art. “I think it’s always a good opportunity for people to come down to the downtown, and to have all of the events going on highlights the arts quite a bit.”
    Oliver had some of his students set up shop throughout the downtown area to paint “plein air” paintings.
    The art walk also gave Pitt State’s Enactus club a chance to promote the organization’s student-run store Krimson Kultuur’s new hours.
    “A lot of people who come to Art Walk appreciate the arts and some of the other objects and merchandise that we have here,” said Jeffrey Yankovich, freshman in international business and president of Enactus. “We have increased customer flow during days like this as it really brings a lot of our clientele to a common area.”
    Krimson Kultuur also hosted a ‘meet the artist day’ during the walk where customers could talk with the artisans behind the store’s wares.
    “We have several of our small local vendors and some vendors from a little outside of the area here to show off their products and their businesses and their merchandise,” said Yankovich.
    Some PSU students who attended the art walk, such as Matthew Polak, were there to support their friends who were performing in one of the three groups set up throughout the downtown.
    “A friend of mine was playing, so supporting him was my first priority for coming here,” said Polak, junior in graphic design “I have come to an Art Walk before, I had an exhibit one year and I like to tour around and see the arts.”
    Students who have lived in Pittsburg all their lives say the Art Walk is important to the city’s culture.
    “I went to high school here and I had a booth for two or three of them,” said freshman in social work Amanda Williams. “I love it. I try to go to every one.”

  • Casual look inspires outfit

    The Career Clothes Closet, located on the second floor of Horace Mann, provides students with an outfit of three pieces for free.
    This look was inspired by some of the more casual teachers on campus. Even though the look is downplayed, it is still a good everyday idea to dress nicer at work. For those hot summer days, when wearing a suit is out of the question, a nice khaki pant and button-up will substitute nicely.

    Steven Frazier

    Steven Frazier


    The model in the picture, Steven Frazier, is a junior in business management who says that the closet was a great place to pick up a few nice garments to add to his wardrobe because he will need them in the future.
    Rachael Jones, the student who created the look, is a senior biology major and is hoping to find out more about the fashion industry from a consumer’s view.
    Each of the looks featured in this article are available in the Career Clothes Closet. All clothing in the closet is free to students. The Look of the Week is brought to you by the partnership between the office of Career Services, the department of Family and Consumer Sciences fashion merchandising program, and The Collegio.   

  • Greeks show Patriotism
  • 312th Army Band honors vets

    | Kyleigh Becker reporter |

    More than 75 people gathered to hear the 312th Army Band on Sunday, April 19.
    The concert was held in the Bicknell Family Center for the Arts.
    Robert Claggett, chief warrant officer 4, says the 312th Army Band had performed for Pitt State before, but this was the band’s first appearance at the Bicknell Center.
    “We also performed when they dedicated the Veterans Memorial,” he said.
    Claggett added his favorite song may be the one he’s conducting: “Black Granite,” but he does not know the entire line up since he was only guest conductor for part of the concert.
    Claggett was the commander of the 312th for 18 years and now works in the regional office in Wisconsin.
    Stan Jones, alum and Army musician of 26 years, 15 of which have been with the 312th, says he was impressed by the concert’s venue.
    “The auditorium is first-rate,” he said. “I’d never thought I’d have the opportunity to play in a venue like this, especially for my alma mater.”
    Jones plays both the guitar for the popular ensemble and the trombone for the concert band and has favorite songs for each instrument.
    “Our version of ‘Uptown Funk’ is going to be pretty fun,” he said. “And ‘Stars and Stripes Forever’ is always good when we play it.”
    Other songs performed that night included “Sweet Land of Liberty,” “Danzas Cubanas,” and a “Star Wars” medley.
    The 312th also recognized veterans during the concert. Four Air Force, five Navy, two Marine Corp and more than 20 (not counting band members) Army veterans stood up in the audience.
    Pitt State ROTC cadets, such as Jacob Daniels, senior in construction management, were also in attendance.
    “We volunteer to come out and show the school and help the community,” he said.
    ROTC members helped hand out fliers, open the doors and greet the audience as they entered the Bicknell Center.
    Daniels says though the ROTC cadets were not required to attend, it was requested.
    Joe Firman, director of the Bicknell Center, says the ROTC cadets were gathered for a specific reason.
    “The mission today is to show that ROTC is here for a bit of public exposure and to help out,” he said.
    One student, Sophia Olsen, sophomore in biology, says she came to do a concert review for her music appreciation class. She says she possibly would have come without the extra incentive of an assignment.
    “It was a really good concert,” she said. “They’re a very diverse group.”
    Olsen added her favorite song performed was “Danzas Cubanas.”

  • Look of the Week

    Spring, with its ever-changing weather, is the time to change our wardrobe from dark colors to light. It is time to break out the lighter weight clothing and the skirts instead of heavy warm clothing. All these factors are what inspired my look of the week.

    Alexis Jackson is a junior in fashion merchandising.

    Alexis Jackson is a junior in fashion merchandising.


    After college I plan to work in a corporate office for an apparel company, preferably the sportswear industry. I am not really into trendy fashion but I love sports, and sportswear is considered fashion.
    I went into the Career Closet looking for an outfit with a skirt and a nice top. There are several great options, but the one I ended up with was the total package.
    I found a pink skirt and a nice suit jacket to go with it. But then I found this white suit jacket with a matching skirt. The outfit also had a matching white top, but I like color so I added a spring-colored pink top to replace the white top.
    Also, I chose the skirt because it is more appropriate for spring. This outfit can be worn to professional interviews and still be comfortable in many temperate changes. The jacket was not too heavy, either, so it can be worn comfortably if it is chilly in the morning or raining.
    Each of the looks featured in this article are available in the Career Clothes Closet, located on the second floor of Horace Mann.  All clothing in the Career Clothes Closet is free to all students.  The Look of the Week is brought to you by the Office of Career Services, the department of Family and Consumer Sciences Fashion Merchandising program, and the Collegio.
    Alexis Jackson is a junior in fashion merchandising.

  • Pop culture clash!

    | Charles A. Ault reporter |

    A trivia competition on Friday, April 10, took over the Bicknell Family Center for the Arts for the evening.
    The trivia night was part of Student Activities Council’s (SAC) Gorilla Nights.
    “I was looking for ideas on what to do for a late night and I saw this one,” said Jordan Simoncic, graduate student in business and organizer of the event. “Trivia Crack was really big at the time and so I thought this would be good.”
    About a dozen students attended and the Bicknell staff decided to join in to provide more competition.
    “I thought it had more potential to be a really good event if more people came,” said Kristen Daniel, freshman in nursing. “I think it would be really fun with a big group, but unfortunately it’s just at a time and a place that I don’t think a lot of people showed up.”
    The game was put on by the Karkut Entertainment Group. Karkut Entertainment is based in Pennsylvania and specializes in producing game shows at colleges nationwide.
    For the first round of the competition, participants were given a clicker with five buttons on it. Each button corresponded to the options on series of multiple-choice questions displayed on the stage’s overhead projector. Those who answered correctly were awarded points based upon how quick their response time was.
    The top four contestants of the first round were eligible to continue onto the second round, which took place on stage.
    The four were asked to put on hardhats with lights rigged to them. For the second round, theme songs from popular television shows were played over the PA system for contestants to identify. The participants rang in to answer by smacking their helmets, which would cause them to light up.
    “I liked watching people have fun and hitting themselves on the head,” said Erica Stacey, junior in elementary education. “It was interesting”
    After one participant answered five questions correctly, they and the second-highest scorer solidified a seat in the final round and a chance at $250.
    The first two rounds were repeated again, pulling more attendees from the audience and leaving the final round with four total contestants.
    The final round had contestants identify songs again, but this time the songs came from movies, sitcoms and pop songs.
    After a half hour of head hitting, Jacob Riemann walked off stage victoriously to claim his prize of $250.
    “Basically, all those times where I was sitting around on the couch watching TV and listening to music paid off,” said Riemann, senior in marketing. “It felt pretty good to win the money, especially when you want to be able to have money to pay bills or gas or go out in town.”
    Final contestant Jacob Wylie, junior in chemistry, says he enjoyed the experience even though he didn’t win.
    “I thought it was really, really, really, really fun,” he said. “I knew most of the answers, but the guy who won was just way too quick and I don’t know how he knew so quickly.”
    Audience members were also elated by the game-show themed evening.
    “I thought it was super fun,” Stacey said. “I mean, everyone that was here was really active and involved and it was a fun atmosphere.”

  • Stomp drums it’s way into Pittsburg

    | Gretchen Burns reporter |

    The Bicknell Family Center for the Arts thrummed with the beats of the renowned musical group STOMP on Monday, April 13.
    Catherine Jepson was one of the lucky students to obtain a ticket for the sold-out performance.

    The cast of Stomp makes noises using various household items and things found of the street including dust pans, street signs, sinks, brooms, and more during their performance at the Bicknell Art Center on Monday, April 13.

    The cast of Stomp makes noises using various household items and things found of the street including dust pans, street signs, sinks, brooms, and more during their performance at the Bicknell Art Center on Monday, April 13.


    “It was amazing,” Jepson, senior in 3-D art, said. “It was really amazing that such a well-known production was here in Pittsburg, we are fortunate. I have always wanted to see STOMP and I am glad I had the chance to.”
    STOMP recently celebrated its 21st anniversary in the United States. Kris Lee, STOMP performer, spoke to the Collegio about her experience performing with the group.
    “I’ve only been in the company for about two years,” she said. “I don’t have the personal connection that others do who have been in the show for so long, but I can tell you that it’s an amazing show. It’s always changing and that’s why it’s been around for 21 years.
    “If it was the same show with the same routine, it wouldn’t be open. But the creators keep it fresh, they’re always changing routines. You could come back and see it a few times and it will always be different.”
    Lee added the show is thriving and is like a family for those in the company.
    “The newer members of the company learn a lot from older members, some of whom have been with STOMP for more than 10 years,” Lee said. “You meet a lot of legends, what we call “STOMP Legends,” and it’s great.”
    Lee says when traveling, the biggest venue is often the one STOMP performs at. Much of the time, that large venue happens to be at a university. Many of the members have solo pieces they perform, all original compositions, which helps keep the constant change and evolution of the show.
    “I’m a drummer, so the best part is for me to just get to kind of nerd out with all the polyrhythms and rhythms and all that,” Lee said. “It’s really special to be on that stage performing and getting that energy from all of the audience.”
    Dagen Worthington, sophomore in chemistry, says he enjoyed the whole show but was very impressed with the black pipes that the performers used to create sound.
    “I really enjoyed the black pipes they used,” he said. “It was interesting how the different lengths of pipe caused it to be such a different sound.”
    Brittany Mundy, freshman in chemistry, was another Pitt State student whose dream of seeing STOMP came true Monday night.
    “I saw a STOMP video in music class and was in love with it,” Mundy said. “I wanted to see it live so badly and drove my mom nuts trying to make music with everything in our house for months after that. I never imagined that I would get to see them in Pittsburg, Kansas of all places.”

  • Look of the Week

    Empowering women through fashion

    Fashion comes in all shapes, sizes and colors; there is no one set fashion. This is what I keep in mind when I am picking out my outfits.

    Blake Hamilton is a junior in fashion merchandising.

    Blake Hamilton is a junior in fashion merchandising.


    Before going into the Career Closet I was skeptical that I could find something that would fit, was up-to-date and looked professional.
    I came across a hounds-tooth jacket and a flattering dress that was sleek and sophisticated. I stuck with the black and white color scheme because it is professional and you can always add a pop of color if you want to. There were many articles of clothing to choose from, including pantsuits, jackets, skirts and blouses. They also had a nice selection of men’s clothing.
    When I came to Pittsburg State University I had my mind set on being a pediatrician, but after some classes I decided I wanted a major that gave me the freedom to express myself and to use my creativity to help others and their wardrobe. So far fashion merchandising is everything I thought it was going to be. I enjoy the hands-on activities that give us more practice in the field. We go out into the community and put visual displays together to add to our portfolios.
    Changing my major to fashion merchandising has made me that much closer to my goal of designing a line of women’s workout apparel. I want the line to appeal to many style tastes and at the same time be something that is flattering, functional and has an appealing price tag. I want to empower women and let the level of confidence they exude shine through.
    Each of the looks featured in this article are available in the Career Clothes Closet, located on the second floor of Horace Mann.  All clothing in the Career Clothes Closet is free to all students.  The Look of the Week is brought to you by the partnership between the Office of Career Services, the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences Fashion Merchandising program, and the Collegio.
    Blake Hamilton is a junior in fashion merchandising.

  • Parents, kids enjoy artworks

    | Pan Liu Reporter |

    Art Family Day attracted more than 20 families to the first floor of Porter Hall on Saturday, April 4.
    The event is one that the Art Department tries to hold once a semester. This semester, the event was co-sponsored by the group Art Connectors.
    Kids and their parents viewed the exhibit “Magnificent Migration” in the University Gallery, which displays more than 30 pieces of art, including ceramic, mixed media and painting, created by Ariel Bowman on the theme of prehistoric animals.
    “They view the show together and we have volunteers in there to tour them around, enjoy the show,” said Josie Mai, associate professor of art.
    For some kids, this might be their first visit to an art gallery. Mai says that these events are an opportunity to educate the public about the purpose of art galleries.
    “Because once they get into the car and go home, all they have is their memory from 20 minutes ago, and the parents usually don’t pull out the paper. So if they are all inspired at that very moment, or curious at that moment, I want them be able to show that,” Mai said.
    The families participated in three activities: fashion a circus animal with Model Magic, a sculpturing clay, draw animal pictures or construct animal figures using models and blocks.
    Mai says the goal was to get children to experience art instead of just viewing it. They needed to give the children some way to let their imaginations loose after the showing.
    “So the activities that I designed offering the circus animals have to do with drawing animals and giving them specific skills, putting costumes on the animals,” Mai said.
    Adam Radlund, a fourth-grader at Central Elementary School in Columbus, says he enjoyed the art projects.
    “I made a rhinoceros and a crocodile,” he said. “You have to have even blocks to set up on top of the rhinoceros. It’s really hard, but I feel I accomplished something.”
    His mother, Margaret, a teacher at Riverton High School, says she found out about the event from her daughter, a PSU nursing student.
    “I think it’s a good experience. It gives him some diverse activity and opens his eyes,”she said.
    Wensdae Raio, a 6-year-old from Frontenac Elementary, says she wants to be an artist like her dad, Robert, who is a 3-D fine art student at Pitt State.
    “She is really involved to thinking creatively,” Robert said.
    Mai says such events help bring the world of art to non-artists.
    “The goal is to get the general public into our space, see the artwork and interact with the artwork, and even make art,” she said.

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