Auction helps Make-A-Wish Foudation

<h2> | Gretchen Burns reporter | </h2>

Last Thursday night, April 10, saw 11 students being auctioned off in the U-Club of Overman Student Center for the Bachelor/Bachelorette Auction.
The event was a senior project put on by Erica Gutierrez, senior in social work, who wanted to do a fun fundraiser for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.
Students presented themselves on stage individually and were then auctioned off. If buyers wanted to have a “free” date, they could take their date to a dinner provided after the auction. Otherwise, buyers were required to take their dates on a “real” date elsewhere, where they would have to pay.
“I searched for fundraising ideas online and saw a bachelor/bachelorette auction and I thought it would be something fun to do and people would want to come and watch,” Gutierrez said. “I raised almost $200, which was my goal in the beginning.”
About 18 people attended the auction as potential buyers, with auctioneers being sold from $2-$20.

During the bachelor and bachelorette auction on Thursday April 10, John O'Grady, junior in finance, is being auctioned off by Duffie Floree, a junior in psychology, to raise money for the Make a Wish Foundation.

During the bachelor and bachelorette auction on Thursday April 10, John O’Grady, junior in finance, is being auctioned off by Duffie Floree, a junior in psychology, to raise money for the Make a Wish Foundation.

Megan Pavlu, junior in psychology, was one of four girls auctioned off at the event. Although she disagreed with the concept of “selling people,” she says the cause of the proceeds was a good idea.
“I did not love the idea of being auctioned off,” Pavlu said. “I mean it is pretty much the antithesis of who I am and what I believe. People are not expendable and do not have monetary value. That being said, I did have a good time just being around old friend and meeting new ones who had all come together to do something good for a good cause.”
Quentin Cook, junior in general studies, also attended the event, but as a buyer.
“I think the Make-A-Wish Foundation is a wonderful foundation,” he said. “It’s a great cause and I don’t mind spending the money. The people who volunteered to do this are amazing. I imagine it’s pretty awkward to be up on stage and be bid on. However, I only brought $20 so I can’t go very far with how much I spend tonight.”
Annie Myracle, senior in general studies, says she was nervous to be auctioned off but volunteered anyway.
“I was really nervous but excited because I wanted to contribute to the Make-A-Wish Foundation,” Myracle said. “I went for $2 but that was mainly because the crowd was low on guys there.”
Pavlu says she was a bit disheartened by the amount of money she went for, $5.50.
“It was not a lot of money,” Pavlu said. “As a person it did not feel like I was worth much. I suppose any amount of money would do that to a girl. As far as charity goes, it may not be enough to make a wish come true, but every little bit counts when you are making dreams into realities.”
Gutierrez says if she were to do the fundraiser again she would not change anything that happened during the event but she does wish she had advertised more.
“The event went well, but I think if it was in a different location, maybe upstairs, which we tried for instead of down, it would’ve been better location-wise,” Myracle said. “A child’s wish was granted because of the money we made, and I think that’s the most rewarding of the whole part of the fundraiser.”

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