Sports panelists discuss journalism in social media

| Michael Bauer sports editor |

With social media changing the way people communicate and receive news, challenges have been brought to sports journalists all over the world. For Mike Arbuckle, Kansas City Royals senior adviser; Mark Schremmer, Joplin Globe sports reporter; and Troy Comeau, PSU director of broadcasting, the changes couldn’t be any more apparent.

During the sports panel on Monday Feb. 3, Mark Schremmer, a Joplin Globe reporter, Troy Comeau, PSU director of broadcasting, and Mike Arbuckle, the Royals senior advisor discuss how sports journalism is affected by new media.

During the sports panel on Monday Feb. 3, Mark Schremmer, a Joplin Globe reporter, Troy Comeau, PSU director of broadcasting, and Mike Arbuckle, the Royals senior advisor discuss how sports journalism is affected by new media.


On Monday, Feb. 3, Arbuckle, Schremmer and Comeau participated in a sports panel discussion of “Sports Journalism in the Age of New Media” to discuss how sports reporting has changed over time with technology and social media.
With Mark Arbuckle, associate professor in communication and Mike Arbuckle’s brother, serving as moderator, the panelists also answered questions from the audience.
The topics ranged from how reporting has changed to what is different in sports journalism from the last 20 years.
“One of the big changes is the quantity of information,” Mike Arbuckle said. “Today, you can jump on the website and see what’s changed. It’s a whole different world.”
Another change in sports journalism has been the increase in reporters’ versatility.
“Broadcasting is not just about standing in front of the camera,” Comeau said. “You have to be able to do it all.”
With newspapers moving online for over a decade, sports reporters have had to switch from just writing to do more on-camera work.
“I’m having to become more versatile. The big thing is the direction of where we’re going in,” he said.
One of the biggest concerns, the panelists say, is trying to figure out if some breaking news is accurate or not.
“It’s hard for students to understand what journalism is,” he said. “People read message boards and they think that’s what journalism is.”
It’s not just Facebook and Twitter that have contributed to this. Message boards haven’t helped, either.
“People on message boards don’t have to check their sources,” Schremmer said. “But we’re (checking our sources) through the process.”
That process includes checking the source and confirming information with the people involved in a news story.
“You have to make sure the story is correct,” Schremmer said.
This was the first time PSU’s Department of Communication has held a sports panel discussion. Mark Arbuckle says they plan to sponsor another one in the future.
“These things apply in any field you work in,” he said.

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