‘Game’ of leadership

| Robin Siteneski reporter |

About 100 Pitt State students braved the slippery roads Saturday morning to learn how to be better leaders. They traded the comfort of their beds to participate in workshops and lectures on subjects such as resume building, advertising and intercultural communication.
The attendance was smaller than expected, but students who were at the Basic Leadership Training say that waking up early was worth it.

Members of Sigma Sigma Simga work with their teammates at building a gingerbread house without speaking to one another during the Basic Leadership Training on Sat. Febuary 1st.

Members of Sigma Sigma Simga work with their teammates at building a gingerbread house without speaking to one another during the Basic Leadership Training on Sat. Febuary 1st.


“I learned that effective communication is pretty much the key and that anybody can be a leader,” said Connor Goodman, junior in history, said.
He participated in a breakout session – there were nine total – that asked students to build a gingerbread house without talking to each other.
Gabrielle Hornsby says the session made her realize how important communication is in the gingerbread construction business.
“It was difficult because we had to build a house exactly the same as the others without talking,” Hornsby, a communication major, said. “I’m a hands-on person so that was my favorite session of the training.”
In another session, students were encouraged to talk as much as they could to discuss stereotypes. They wrote on white boxes whatever came to mind when thinking about such topics as sexual diversity, religion, fraternities and cheerleaders. The boxes formed a wall that was later destroyed to signify the smashing of all stereotypes.
The keynote speaker was a stay-at-home-mom-turned life coach, Sylvia Hall. She pointed out that thoughts have the power to shape people’s lives.
In another session, Craig Fuchs, director of the honors college, talked about how to be a servant leader. Being able to delegate is essential, he said.
“I am a control man,” Fuchs said. “You have to be able to understand that they might not do it exactly the way you would, but the end product is what is important.”
Delegation and teamwork were important for the student organizers, who are part of the university’s Presidential Emerging Leaders Program.
Ten members, all in the third year of the four-year program, organized the training. The program has about 47 students who helped in different sessions. Kate Wildeman, junior in biology, said she was happy with how the event turned out.
“It was a challenge organizing something this big,” she said. “It was interesting to see our ability to work together.”

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