[Insert porn joke here]

Logan Qualls | writer

A young man with few cares and fewer worries, Don Jon appears to be the ultimate bachelor.
The modern-day Don Juan, Jon has no trouble seducing women and bringing them home for a one-night stand. In addition to his undeniable charm and dashing good looks, Jon also has an uncontrollable obsession with watching pornography. Jon, in his effort to lose himself, relies on pornography for satisfaction.
The film does a great job of showing this addictive side to pornography, depicting the incessant urge to watch porn or think about watching porn. His chances of ever having intimacy with a woman have been shattered by the allure of porn compounded by his objectification of nearly every aspect of his life.

Don Jon

Don Jon


Jon reveals early in the film that he enjoys porn more than actual sex. His thoughts are dominated by delusions of sexual intimacy.
Don “Don Jon” Martello Jr. (Joseph Gordon-Levitt; “The Dark Knight Rises,” “Looper”) looks for a change in his lifestyle.
That change comes in the form of Barbara Sugarman, (Scarlett Johansson; “The Avengers,” “He’s Just Not That Into You”) a woman he meets at the bar who Jon claims is the most beautiful thing he has ever seen.
His usual routine of seduction halted by Barbara, Jon seizes the opportunity for change by deciding to play the “long game.”
Hoping that by pursuing a meaningful, dedicated relationship, he will be able to reduce and ultimately end his dependence on porn. However, audiences soon notice that Barbara has an agenda of her own.
A solid performance from the entire cast, with Levitt and Julianne Moore’s on-screen developing relationship ending up as highlight. As their characters interact, begin to learn more about each other, and eventually connect, audiences can see the transformative effect the relationship has on each character.
The dialogue throughout the film feels natural and genuine.
The music, scored by Nathan Johnson, is effective and adds to the film’s overall ambience without distracting.
The cinematography is great, the scenes between Jon and the priest being some of the most poignantly executed.
While the film breaches a topic that is considered taboo, it isn’t presented overbearingly. That is, the directorial pursuit isn’t about shock and awe, but instead a genuine attempt to look at our shortcomings as a society while still maintaining that irrepressible, human spirit.
In Levitt’s debut as a writer and director, he proves himself by presenting a real societal problem with young men being enticed by pornography, which reinforces the misgiving that these objectifying depictions of women are natural or right.
Wrapped up in a romantic comedy, the film manages to take a topic that is uncomfortable for most and deliver it in a human, salient manner that allows audiences to approach the topic lightheartedly rather than disregarding it entirely.

Leave A Comment