Showing-off science

Students gather in Overman to present research findings

Audrey Tucker | reporter

The 2013 Research Colloquium was held Monday, April 15, in the Overman Student Center. Ten judges evaluated student oral presentations and projects outlined on posters.
These students have been working on their projects for several months. Most of the students say they will be continuing research and plan to present their findings at other events in the future.
The Graduate and Continuing Studies program sponsored the event.
The winners will be announced on Wednesday, April 24, during the Graduate School and Research Awards Banquet.
Will Dixon and Dustin Newman, both seniors in electronics engineering technology, presented a poster entitled, “Bluetooth Enabled Home Power Control.”
The pair created Android cell phone software that controls electrical devices from your phone using Bluetooth technology. Dixon says that the app can control electrical outlets, locks and light switches.
“We’ve been working on it since August and we are very excited about the outcome,” Newman said.
The device will be set up on Friday, April 19, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. during the Design Symposium in the Kansas Technology Center.
Kori Bower and Amanda Tompkins, who are both seniors in social work, created the project “Parenting a Child with a Developmental Disability.”
Bower and Tompkins contacted Indian immigrant parents of disabled children throughout the country on Facebook. Participants were surveyed on their well-being.
Out of the 32 participants, 75 percent of the parents were female and 72 percent of the developmentally disabled children were male.
The most common disability recorded was autism. They found that these parents are under significant stress over planning for their children’s future in the long term and noted that religious practice seems to be their primary method of coping. Spousal relationships were their top support.
“I was somewhat surprised by the findings,” Bower said, “I did not expect them to have such a high number of spousal support.”
She added that they spent many hours finding enough participants of the right demographic. They will be taking their project to Seattle, Wash., for the Biannual Child Conference later in the week.
Jessica Criser, senior in nursing, presented a project entitled, “Are Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions Effective in Reducing Injection Pain in Infants Six Months of Age and Younger?”
Criser says she explored techniques that could reduce signs of pain for infants, such as crying and muscle tension, in infants during immunization shots.
She concluded that breastfeeding, increasing the speed of injection and soaking a pacifier in sugar water all decreased pain in the infants.
“It is important to me because I give injections to infants all the time,” Criser said.
She also says that if these techniques were more common, development of fear of injection by infants would become less common.
The 2013 Research Colloquium was held Monday, April 15, in the Overman Student Center. Ten judges evaluated student oral presentations and projects outlined on posters.
These students have been working on their projects for several months. Most of the students say they will be continuing research and plan to present their findings at other events in the future.
The Graduate and Continuing Studies program sponsored the event.
The winners will be announced on Wednesday, April 24, during the Graduate School and Research Awards Banquet.
Will Dixon and Dustin Newman, both seniors in electronics engineering technology, presented a poster entitled, “Bluetooth Enabled Home Power Control.”
The pair created Android cell phone software that controls electrical devices from your phone using Bluetooth technology. Dixon says that the app can control electrical outlets, locks and light switches.
“We’ve been working on it since August and we are very excited about the outcome,” Newman said.
The device will be set up on Friday, April 19, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. during the Design Symposium in the Kansas Technology Center.
Kori Bower and Amanda Tompkins, who are both seniors in social work, created the project “Parenting a Child with a Developmental Disability.”
Bower and Tompkins contacted Indian immigrant parents of disabled children throughout the country on Facebook. Participants were surveyed on their well-being.
Out of the 32 participants, 75 percent of the parents were female and 72 percent of the developmentally disabled children were male.
The most common disability recorded was autism. They found that these parents are under significant stress over planning for their children’s future in the long term and noted that religious practice seems to be their primary method of coping. Spousal relationships were their top support.
“I was somewhat surprised by the findings,” Bower said, “I did not expect them to have such a high number of spousal support.”
She added that they spent many hours finding enough participants of the right demographic. They will be taking their project to Seattle, Wash., for the Biannual Child Conference later in the week.
Jessica Criser, senior in nursing, presented a project entitled, “Are Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions Effective in Reducing Injection Pain in Infants Six Months of Age and Younger?”
Criser says she explored techniques that could reduce signs of pain for infants, such as crying and muscle tension, in infants during immunization shots.
She concluded that breastfeeding, increasing the speed of injection and soaking a pacifier in sugar water all decreased pain in the infants.
“It is important to me because I give injections to infants all the time,” Criser said.
She also says that if these techniques were more common, development of fear of injection by infants would become less common.

Leave A Comment