Magician performs for charity

Marcus Clem | Collegio Reporter

The young magician stood atop the padlocked and chained box at the climax of his performance, ready to do the impossible.
Cloaked behind a concealing glossy curtain, only his head and arms are visible. He begins the countdown to his favorite, and most difficult, trick. One, two… three, the last number is called by his assistant, who, having escaped from handcuffs and a tightly sealed box that had been carefully inspected by a random member of the audience, popped suddenly into his place. The surprise was not over, though. The curtain dropped and the assistant removed the locks and chains from the wooden chest, opening it to reveal Jay Temaat packed tightly inside, his hands cuffed.
“He knows his trade, he does it flawlessly, and he is just really awesome in the spotlight,” said Tristan Zavala, sophomore in chemistry and physics education.

Jay Temaat, teen magician, performed amazing levitation tricks at PSU in the grimson and gold ballroom on Tuesday, Sep 11th. Temaat has perfromed in Las Vegas and won scholarships for his dedication and love for magic.

Jay Temaat, teen magician, performed amazing levitation tricks at PSU in the grimson and gold ballroom on Tuesday, Sep 11th. Temaat has perfromed in Las Vegas and won scholarships for his dedication and love for magic.


At the age of 17, Temaat has already established a career of national prominence, having opened for a variety of top-flight magicians in Las Vegas before crowds of thousands. This event was a bit smaller. Approximately 45 people combined attended his two shows, says Lindsey Greve, volunteer and junior in family consumer sciences.
The show lasted approximately 75 minutes and featured a wide variety of tricks, including one that seemingly caused Temaat’s body, complete with moving limbs in each section, to be split in two.
“I gotta give it to the whole box-in-half,” said Michael Giffin, senior in broadcasting and Spanish. “I can’t figure out how he was that flexible or where he went.”
The proceeds for Temaat’s show were donated to the Keith Worthington chapter of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing assistance to victims of ALS, as well as contributing to research for a cure. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, causes progressive and, in most cases, fatal total body paralysis. Awareness of ALS became widespread after the historic New York Yankees baseball player Lou Gehrig, fell victim to it. It is also believed to be afflicting internationally renowned physicist Stephen Hawking.
Temaat spoke of his inspiration to perform for the public as stemming from his earliest performances in homes for the chronically ill and elderly. He related a personal story where he brought happiness to a man suffering from a terminal disease and who had been persistently depressed. After learning that the man died that same day, Temaat says, he knew that stage magic would be his lifelong career.
“His inspiration is a pretty heart-touching story,” said Mac Crowe, close friend of Temaat.

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