Romney jumps the gun

Libyan men protest against Ansar al-Shariah Brigades and other Islamic militias in Benghazi, Libya, Friday, Sept. 21.

John T. Sullivan | Guest Columnist When I was growing up and taking citizenship classes in school, we were always taught that “politics stops at the water’s edge” and that “we only have one president at a time.” I guess all of that went out the window on Sept. 11 when Mitt Romney, with less than cautious abandon, dove into the precarious political waters of Middle Eastern uncertainty to heap scorn on the president of the United States at a time when unity of purpose, resolve and response would have made more sense. Clearly, for whatever reason, Romney jumped the gun to inject himself into an ongoing crisis, while prudence dictated that he hold his…

Is nuclear energy safe enough?

Digamber Eslampure | Collegio Writer The demand for energy has been increasing consistently, and it will only get greater. But natural energy resources such as coal, water and oil are rapidly being depleted and can no longer meet the demand, forcing nations to search for alternative energy resources. Nuclear energy gave hope for future energy production, but some incidents forced us to fundamentally rethink using it. Nuclear energy currently provides only 6 percent of the energy used. The debate about nuclear energy safety gained momentum in recent years, especially after the Fukushima disaster in Japan in 2011. There have been other nuclear power plant accidents in the past. The Chernobyl disaster in Ukraine in 1986…

Distrust the media, but don’t disregard it

Marcus Clem | Collegio Reporter I’m about to enter a career that is in big trouble. On Sept. 21, The Gallup Organization, well known for its titan status in the business of public sentiment research, published a poll. This poll showed that at more than at any other time on record, Americans distrust the national mass media to report the news fully, accurately and fairly. A total of 60 percent of Americans reported to Gallup that they hold this alarmingly negative sentiment. Of even greater concern may be a poll showing that only 39 percent of Americans say that they follow the news, any news, closely. That number is up this year, from 35 percent…

Windy City site of latest teachers’ union battle

A young girl holds up a sign in support of striking Chicago school teachers during a rally Saturday, Sept. 15, in Chicago.

Teachers strike for right reasons Luis Aranda | Guest Writer The Chicago teachers union had been on strike for more than a week, displacing 350,000 Chicago public school students from their classrooms. The strike has brought the third largest school district in the country to a halt, sending teachers to the picket lines, forcing administrators to scramble to staff alternative programs for students and forcing parents to make accommodations for their children. The teachers have every right to strike because the actions, and inactions, of the Chicago public schools administration and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. I am a native Chicagoan; I was born and raised in the city’s south side. I am not a product…

Mulsim protests target U.S. embassies

Digamber Eslampure | Collegio Writer From Morocco to Malaysia, from Tunis to Khartoum, anti-American protests have erupted and mainly target U.S. embassies. The protesters claim the main reason for their actions is the film, “Innocence of Muslims,” which was created in America. This film denigrated the Islamic Prophet Muhammad, and the Islamic community perceived the film to be blasphemous. However, the severity of the protests and attacks indicates that the motives go far beyond the film. If the reason is that the film was made by an American, then why is it necessary to attack the embassies of Britain and Germany? The protests initially started in Egypt, where an angry mob gathered in front of…

Bad weather hurts global food prices

Digamber Eslampure | Collegio Writer Global food prices are increasing daily, leaving families around the world struggling to make ends meet. However, bad weather is making the problem worse. According to the World Bank’s Food Price Watch report released last month, food prices increased by 10 percent in July alone, mostly due to a major drought in the United States, and dry and hot summers in Eastern Europe. The dry summer in Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan is adding further pressure on food prices, while below average rainfall in India is also a cause for concern. The United States’ Climate Prediction Center expects that the emergence of El Nino in the coming months is likely to…

Does Syria demand U.S. military’s attention?

A soldier for the Free Syrian Army poses in Izaa district in Aleppo, Syria.

U.S. should step in, oust Syrian leaders Bethany Harris | Guest Columnist Syria is in the middle of a conflict within its own borders, and between its own people. The “emergency” government that was established in the 1960s has been in power ever since. In the last decade, there have been many uprisings in an attempt to voice anti-government views, and the majority of these protests have happened in the last year. The military government, led by President Bashar al-Assad, has retained power by using violence. Freedomhouse.org, an independent organization committed to expanding freedom in the world, gives Syria its lowest ratings on political rights and civil liberties because of the one-party system and the…