Isaac hits close to home

Jessica Sewing | Collegio Reporter

Seven years after Hurricane Katrina hit, the Gulf Coast is preparing for another hit. Residents of the southernmost states are boarding up their windows and stocking up on supplies to wait out tropical storm Isaac.

Some PSU students, like Emily Seib, have family or friends who live in areas that are going to be hit by the storm. Seib has been continually checking the reports of what is going on with the storm and even refreshing the weather website every few minutes in case anything changes. Seib’s aunt went through Katrina back in 2005, and she says she thinks this storm will not be nearly as bad.

“I’m not too worried about them,” said Seib, freshman in nursing. “They’ve been through a lot worse. I’m worried about flooding more than anything else.”

A group of thrill-seekers face the waves as they crash over the seawall of Lake Pontchartrain at Canal Boulevard in New Orleans Tuesday, Aug. 28.

A group of thrill-seekers face the waves as they crash over the seawall of Lake Pontchartrain at Canal Boulevard in New Orleans Tuesday, Aug. 28.

Seib says that her family has a group chat going on their phones to all be updated with what is happening. She says her aunt texts photos and videos of where she is and what she’s doing. Her aunt plans to continue to stay at home and wait out the storm.

New Orleans’ mayor issued a citywide curfew from dusk to dawn effective Wednesday night. The intense 70 mph winds, with gusts up to 84 mph, knocked out power to more than 600,000 homes and businesses.

Tropical storm Isaac is pounding cities with relentless rains. Some are predicting this will produce more rain than Katrina did.

A recent PSU graduate is experiencing the storm first-hand. Bruna Pinhoni moved from Pittsburg to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. after she graduated last spring. Over the weekend, Pinhoni attempted to stock up on supplies, but when she went to one of the local stores they were out of water, bread and bananas. She stayed home and tried to wait out the storm, but when Monday came she went into work.

“I didn’t know if I was suppose to go in,” Pinhoni said. “No one else went in except my boss and me.”

Pinhoni says that they were getting warnings of all kinds throughout the weekend: tornado, flood and hurricane warnings.

“The tornado warnings in Pitt scared me, but here it is so much more serious,” Pinhonia said. “I just didn’t know what to do or expect throughout this storm.”

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