The Jungle: ‘out of control’

The broken "Split Face" window at The Jungle.

Val Vita | Managing Editor Kris Bogan frequently goes to The Jungle, a bar right across from campus. He says he has noticed that the atmosphere has changed since the bar started allowing people under the age of 21 to enter on Wednesday nights. “It’s definitely getting out of control,” said Bogan, senior in psychology. “Last Wednesday (Aug. 22) was insane. It was so packed that the sky deck was actually shaking.” A week earlier, on Aug. 15, Natalia Schneider says she came out of The Jungle with her leg bleeding. “I was inside the bar, just talking to my friends, when I heard a burst,” said Schneider, junior in biology. “Everybody looked to the…

“I got hypnotized and now I’m confused”

Student participants show off their moves under hypnosis on stage in the Crimson and Gold ballroon of the Overman Student center on Wednesday August 29th.

Jessica Sewing | Collegio Reporter Students were mesmerized Wednesday night by the four-time college entertainer of the year, Tom DeLuca. DeLuca took around 15 volunteers from the audience to participate in the hypnotizing experience. One of the volunteers, Addie Fahrlander, says the experience was relaxing. “I don’t know if it worked on me,” said Fahrlander, freshman in early childhood education. Unlike Fahrlander, Diana Laflin says that it may have worked too well on her. “I got hypnotized and now I’m confused,” said Laflin, freshman in pre-med. After the show, Laflin and her friends started talking and Laflin says she realized she didn’t remember most of what she did. Laflin’s friends told her that she did…

West Nile rising in Kansas

Mosquitos are sorted at the Dallas County mosquito lab in Dallas. U.S. health officials say there's been an alarming increase in the number of West Nile cases.

Marcus Clem | Collegio Reporter The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga. sent an advisory to all organizations that subscribe to their ListServ-based information service, which includes Pittsburg State University. The advisory stated that a new strain of West Nile Virus, a mosquito-borne illness that common parasites acquire primarily from birds, has spread into the Kansas and Missouri area, according to Carrie Farrington, nurse practitioner at the Bryant Student Health Center. According to the Associated Press, one 85-year old man from Mulvane, Kan. died of West Nile infection. Including that case, 14 cases of fatal West Nile infection have occurred in Kansas since 2002, when the virus first appeared in the state….

People of Pittsburg: Bill Thompson

Bill Thompson rocks 505 Thursday, Aug. 23 during the weekly karaoke night. Bill has been a regular at karaoke for two years.

He’s b-b-b-b-bad to the bone Val Vita | Managing Editor “Bad to the Bone,” an ‘80s song by George Thorogood and The Destroyers, tells the story of a man who was so bad that the hospital nurses knew it the day he was born. This song is one of Bill Thompson’s favorites and his performance can be seen every Thursday at 505, a karaoke bar in Pittsburg. Thompson says it all started two years ago, when he was at a karaoke bar in Branson, Mo., singing “Folsom Prison Blues,” by Johnny Cash. He says he ended up among the five finalists that night, even though he didn’t know it was a competition. “And since that…

Downloading a new way of life

A student logs onto Facebook from a campus computer on Monday, August 27th.

Marcus Clem | Collegio Reporter International students are common at Pitt State and, more often than not, they travel, work, eat and study together. They speak a language foreign to most other students and American students often don’t understand their lifestyle. However, their understanding of our lifestyle is impressive. PSU and the American way of life have had a profound effect on the lives of students like Shuaibin Guo, who is from Henan University of Science and Technology in Luoyang, China. “I think it has been hard for me to adapt to the environment here,” said Guo, graduate student in mechanical engineering technology. “I was surprised by the devotion to football. Chinese people do not…

Dedication of a home to serve PSU

Tim Emert, chair of the Kansas Board of Regents, Steve Scott, PSU president, and Cathy, his wife, Virginia Crossland and Ivan Crossland officially opened the new president's house on Thursday, Aug 23.

Caitlin Taylor | Collegio Reporter The dedication of the new Crossland Family University House was flooded with students, professors, regents and residents on Thursday, Aug. 23. Brad Hodson, vice president for university advancement, began the dedication ceremony by commemorating the numerous city and campus leaders who helped to organize and produce the ceremony and university house. “This house was built completely through private donors and a list of all those donors will be displayed on a dedication plaque that will hang in the guest section of the house,” Hodson said. “In total, it cost $1.75 million.” Hodson says there were three main issues that had to be addressed when planning and building the house. One…

Mosque destruction triggers community rally

An Ozark Christian College student sign the chalk board at a rally in Joplin in support of the Muslim community.

Marcus Clem | Collegio Reporter Hundreds of people from a town still rebuilding from one disaster rallied on Saturday, Aug. 25, to support the victims of another tragedy. “A lot of people showed up,” said Yazeed Aldhwayan, sophomore in business management, who is from Saudi Arabia. “It was an atmosphere of support and love.” The rally was organized to show support for Joplin’s Muslim community, whose Islamic Center suddenly burned down in the early morning of Aug. 6. It came a little more than a year after the city was devastated by an EF5 tornado that killed 160 people and destroyed most of the city’s center. “The thing is, we have already recovered,” said Adnan…

Tobacco’s hazy future

Gretchen Burns | Collegio Reporter Last spring, the Student Government Association asked students to vote on making the campus tobacco-free. A majority of the students who voted said they wanted to make the campus tobacco-free, but making this a reality will not happen immediately. “Although the tobacco-free campus was on the SGA ballot, the final act is not up to the SGA,” said Sydney Ward, vice president of SGA. “We got it started, now we’ve recommended it to the president’s office.” SGA’s involvement could include creating a tobacco-free committee that would help President Steve Scott, and a possible university task force, make various decisions. Scott says he considers a tobacco-free campus to be a high…

Mo. politician’s comments take national stage

This May 17, 2011 file photo shows U.S. Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., announcing his candidacy for U.S. Senate, in Creve Coeur, Mo. Akin said in an interview Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012 with St. Louis television station KTVI that pregnancy from rape is "really rare." Akin, who has said he opposes all abortions, said in the interview if a woman is raped, her body "has ways to shut that whole thing down." (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, file)

Akin’s gaffe gives way to bigger question Marcus Clem | Collegio Reporter Can the words “legitimate” and “rape” be used in any serious, let alone argumentative, manner while conveying a message that is not repulsive? Forget for a moment that the man who used this phrase is Todd Akin, a long-serving member of the U.S. House of Representatives. If we take that fact into account then the firestorm it triggered may well mark a new low bar for elected leaders. Or, in a Congress that has broken records for disruption and public disapproval, it only represents business as usual. We might view Akin as a public official and trusted representative, completely exclusive from his current…

President Scott: ‘It’s really up to us’

PSU President Steve Scott

Val Vita | Managing Editor “Times are interesting, difficult and challenging.” With this sentence, university President Steve Scott started his annual speech at the opening meeting for faculty and staff on Aug. 16. In a good-humored address, Scott talked about the past year’s accomplishments and what he expects in the year ahead. New faculty and staff were introduced at the same event. The first thing Scott mentioned about last year was the progress toward funding construction of a center for the arts. He said the project will cost about $30 million and PSU has already raised $29 million. Scott also talked about athletics, which have a unique status here at PSU. “We had a pretty…