The Doctors are in: Gorilla Geeks hold clinic

Gretchen Burns | Collegio Writer

A free checkup was given to students in the Oval last week. Students could spin a wheel for prizes and munch on bags of popcorn, all while their computers were checked out by the Gorilla Geeks.
According to Jeremy Butler, the event was designed to raise students’ awareness of safe Internet use.
“Students could schedule an appointment for the Gorilla Geeks to run a snapshot of the health of the computer,” said Butler, senior in computer science. “They’d get a view at what the Internet specs of their computer looked like: space used by the Internet, all the downloads and everything.”

Junior in Commercial Graphics, Tyler Posteric puts on a surgical mask and gloves before a computer checkup at the Computer Health and Wellness Fair hosted by Gorilla Geeks on Thursday, April 19. Photo by:Kaitlyn Doherty/Collegio

Junior in Commercial Graphics, Tyler Posteric puts on a surgical mask and gloves before a computer checkup at the Computer Health and Wellness Fair hosted by Gorilla Geeks on Thursday, April 19. Photo by:Kaitlyn Doherty/Collegio


Butler says that 22 students scheduled an appointment with the Gorilla Geeks for computer checkups.
According to William Holloway, if a student’s computer was deemed at risk then they had several options to choose from.
“Depending on the risk, students were advised on how to fix the computer,” said Holloway, junior in computer information systems. “Some of the computers needed the antivirus software to be updated while others were given recommendations of the services offered by the Gorilla Geeks and what that specific service cost.”
Butler says that his top three tips to students trying to keep their computer clean and healthy would be to avoid torrenting programs, have updated antivirus programs and browse the Internet smartly, and not click on random ads that pop up proclaiming the viewer an instant winner.
Holloway says a torrenting program, such as the popular “Frostwire,” is a program that requires the computer to download a package and to unzip each file contained within the package.
Holloway says that he would suggest students not download random stuff.
“Everyone is going to keep using torrenting programs no matter what,” Holloway said. “But if they use it, they should have an antivirus to go with their computer that scans the files and programs very frequently that have been downloaded.”

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