Author merges history, fantasy

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Todd Miller | Collegio Reporter “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.” Just let the name sink in for a moment. It’s the kind of thing you’d hear mentioned in an attempt to ridicule modern literature. It is a statement of fleeting ridiculousness along the same lines as “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,” which was written by the same author (Seth Grahame-Smith.) If you simply dismiss this book then you would miss out on a work of well-crafted fiction. The idea is ridiculous only if you think of it like that. Vampire and zombie stories are popular right now, and if an author wants a vampire story to stand out then he needs to make it unique. Grahame-Smith…

‘Dead Man’ tells tales

Diedre Galloway plays a prosecution lawyer during a rehearsal for “Dead Man Walking” on Tuesday, April 24, in the Black Box Theater. Photo by:Hunter Peterson/Collegio

Carl J. Bachus | Collegio Reporter Playing on the sordid political history of the criminal death penalty, Pitt State’s spring production of “Dead Man Walking,” based on the autobiography by Sister Helen Prejean, is amazing. The play is directed by graduate student Kristy Magee and based on a script by Tim Robbins. The production stars freshman Taylor Patterson as Sister Prejean, a nun chosen to correspond with death row inmate Matthew Poncelet (played by junior Jacob Hacker). Tasked with preventing his execution and saving his soul, Prejean finds herself repulsed by Poncelet’s personality. Poncelet pleads with Prejean to file an appeal on his behalf, claiming total innocence of the crimes he has been convicted of….

Pitt gets fit

Amy Oswald, senior in biology, does an ab workout during the boot camp class in the Rec Center. Photo by:Kenzi Jordan/Collegio

Carl Bachus | Collegio Writer In an effort to increase campus health, Pitt State has created a fitness initiative entitled “Exercise Is Medicine” for this year’s Pitt State Project. Leading the way is Bryce Winklepleck, assistant director of fitness and wellness, who has taken it upon himself to get the campus to make healthier decisions and habits. “My job is to make the campus as healthy as possible by starting events and programs,” Winklepleck said. “I didn’t really do any kind of assessment or anything. I just came in and saw that there was no wellness program here, so I started from the ground up.” Winklepleck says he created the program to promote and enhance…

Birds of a feather flock to PSU

Jen Rainey | Collegio Reporter Students had the opportunity to get a close look at various birds of prey Wednesday, April 18, through the Nature Reach Program. Delia Lister, director of Nature Reach, says the program offers students the chance to see hawks and owls up close, and touch feathers, bird skulls and bones. The event was held as part of Earth Week. “People are typically fascinated by the birds and would probably spend hours looking at them if they could,” said Lister, instructor in biology. “It’s not every day that people get to see birds like these.” About 20 people attended the event and Lister gave extra credit to her students for attending. Kelsey…

Students get the dirty truth on sex education

Jen Rainey | Collegio Reporter Students had an opportunity to learn about sex education in a manner different than some were used to. On Thursday, April 19, Gorillas in Your Midst hosted a Sex Ed Boot Camp in the Crimson and Gold Ballroom. The event was led by Joni Frater and Esther Lastique, a lesbian couple famous for their presentations on romance, love, affection, communication and trust. “We wanted to up the conversation on sex education, not just education on regular STDs and condom use,” said Sara Duffy, senior in communication. “We’re aware students are exposed to that on a regular basis and wanted to bring something different to them.” Duffy says she and Cara…

Apathy squanders health services

Val Vita | Collegio Reporter A $1,600 health survey is causing headaches for J.T. Knoll, coordinator of prevention and wellness, a part of Campus Activities. He says fewer than 300 PSU students have completed the American College Health Survey, even though it was sent by email to more than 3,000 students. Knoll says the survey began on April 1 and the deadline is April 30 and only students who received the email with the subject “Take Pitt Health Survey – Chance to Win Kindle Touch” can participate. Knoll says the Kindle was supposed to be an incentive, but apparently even that can’t convince students to take the survey. “Students aren’t responding at the rate I…

Violent repercussions? | Virtual experiences’ effects on reality

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Video games teach users wrong lesson Ellen Wieberg | Guest columnist The blasting sound of guns fills the air. Your heart is pounding so hard you forget to breathe. Blood covers the ground, bodies, everything in sight. You just slaughtered 20 men mercilessly in a matter of a few minutes, just to rack up a few points or set a new high score. Do you feel bad? Absolutely not. They were just characters in a video game, but the rush and intensity you felt while killing them was all too real. Malicious violence is acceptable is the lesson video games teach the people who play them; they learn it is acceptable to face your problems…

Orbiting space debris threatens Earth

Digamber Eslampure | Collegio Reporter Space junk is emerging as one of the greatest threats to Earth’s orbit. Space junk is comprised of manmade orbiting objects that are no longer used. These include debris from old satellites and spacecrafts, spanners, bolts and other rubbish. We are already grappling with many problems, such as pollution, unsustainable waste management, increasing population, poverty, global warming, overconsumption of natural resources, growing water problems and deforestation, but space junk adds further strain to the planet. Mankind started launching satellites only 55 years ago, but already we have created a traffic jam of objects orbiting around Earth. Some of the satellites no longer work, yet they still revolve around Earth. They…

Speaker preaches inclusion

Zach Wagner | Collegio Reporter Good leadership can have a profound effect in creating an inclusive society, said Sara Mata, a grant coordinator for Oklahoma State University who spoke Tuesday in front of a small group of PSU students in the Governors Room. “Those who seem to be acting out, are merely trying to lead the rest of everyone in their own expression,” said Matta, who spoke about her life and how she stumbled on the field of social activism. Mata said her past experiences in various social work positions have contributed to her knowledge about the controversy behind leadership traits and the different perceptions about immigration that exist in today’s society. Though she started…

Club’s event covers calligraphy, culture

Val Vita | Collegio Repórter Shiqi Xu was 4 years old when he learned traditional Chinese calligraphy from a private teacher in China. On Friday, April 20, he demonstrated this technique, writing words in Chinese in front of a group of students who attended the Chinese Culture and Art Event in Yates Hall. “This shouldn’t be a performing art,” said Xu, graduate student in technology engineering. “It has to be in someplace quiet, without people watching. But I wasn’t nervous. When I write, I calm down and try not to get distracted.” Xu used a brush he brought from his country. It is made of wolf hair and bamboo stick, and he has been using…