Term Limit

Paul W. Zagorski, PSU professor

Term limits would lead to progress Jeffrey Tangney | Collegio Reporter Business as usual continues in Washington. Congress remains in gridlock and the time spent passing bills is far too long to make any headway in righting the country. Change is needed and I believe a solution can be found through imposing term limits on congressmen. When the country was founded, there existed no term limits on any office. Yet it was still believed that no one should have a lifetime appointment in a high rank. George Washington stepped down after two terms, setting a standard that was followed for 150 years and, after President Franklin Roosevelt, the two-term presidential limit was enacted into law…

Communicating in the modern world

Todd Miller | Collegio writer Forums, Skype, FaceBook, Twitter, instant and text messaging; as technology continues to grow, so does our means to communicate. It’s a fact that humanity has and will continue to find more ways to communicate. We’re social creatures, it’s what we do. Early mail systems existed for centuries, and semaphore lines began around the 1700s. The U.S. Postal Service was founded in 1775, Samuel Morse made the telegraph in 1837 and 39 years later, Alexander Graham Bell patented the early telephone. I used to think the telegraph and telephone were invented centuries apart, but only 40 years separated the two. Each invention greatly improved worldwide society and continued to bring the world…

Todd Miller Collegio Reporter  Our campus offers a lot for students in the way of classes. Of course, there are our required courses for our individual majors, but also several classes that are available or even that we must take for general-education requirements. Sure, “gen-ed” classes may seem pointless to some on the surface, but they are useful for helping us survive in and even contribute to society. One class I’ve taken that especially comes to mind is “Consumer Education and Personal Finance.” The class is only one of a handful needed for general-education requirements, but can be useful in helping to prepare students for the future. I know it better helped me figure out…

The money trail reveals all, especially in Washington Madison Dennis | Collegio editor-in-chief The hysteria of the 2012 elections is upon us already. Home pages are filled with political gossip, news channels analyze Sarah Palin’s every move, and Iowa gets more traffic than it has since 2008. Although the craze is only beginning, one constant question is still being asked: In a purportedly broken political system, does my vote even matter? I’m not going to argue the answer. However, for those who see the monetary powerhouses controlling Washington and feel powerless, I do suggest that you consider another viewpoint: follow the money – YOUR money. Politicians are often some of the richest, most powerful people…