Coffee price jitters

Students get a jolt over java’s increasing expenses, with no end in sight  Todd Miller | Collegio Reporter Even though the past several months have seen steady increases in the price of coffee, students are saying that they either haven’t noticed, or that it hasn’t affected them. According to the Department of Labor, a single-pound can of coffee that sold for $3.64 will now cost $5.10. That’s a 40 percent increase. Brandon Roark, senior in technology management, says he didn’t even realize that prices were rising. He says it is probably because he only buys coffee occasionally and usually buys whatever is cheapest. Whitney Nickelson, junior in justice studies, however, enjoys drinking coffee often and has…

Don’t sweat it

Students find heat complicates daily activities Madison Dennis | Editor-in-Chief Liz Cranor, sophomore in advertising, tries to run 3.1 miles every day. “It’s been my workout for a long time­ – a 5k,” Cranor said. However, with the recent heat index reaching up to 105 degrees, Cranor has been getting out of shape. Rob Hefley, professor in health, human performance and recreation, said that the summer heat has a marked negative impact on those who spend active time outdoors. “Heat illness is a lot like a hydroelectric power plant,” Hefley said. “You need water to keep things running, and when you start losing water, you start losing power. It starts affecting the neural system.” Cranor…

Gorillas as self-made CEOs

Jen Rainey | Collegio Reporter For Samuel Burch and Lauren Vaughan, both students at Pittsburg State University, working a part-time job wasn’t enough. They’re normal students in most regards; they go to classes and work to make a little extra scratch on the side. The difference is that they made their own jobs. After Samuel Burch, sophomore in justice studies, went through a breakup he decided to turn his passion into a business. He turned to what he’d known since childhood: making comic books. “I went through the worst heartbreak I ever had and needed to do something,” said Burch, who owns his own comic-book company. He, like other students at Pittsburg State University, is…

Gorillas crossing borders:

PSU students recount overseas experiences Stephanie Rogers | Collegio Reporter Two sophomores, Krisanna Graham, in elementary education, and Abbie Smith, in accounting, recently returned from their study abroad experience from Italy to Greece, coming back with plenty of reasons to return in the future. “I already want to go back. A group of us went to see the Trevi fountain at night,” Graham said, recalling her visit to Rome, Italy. “It had pretty architecture and I really liked that it symbolizes love.” She says the trip gave her the opportunity to tour cities and also allowed her to learn and experience Italian culture on her own. Graham and Smith spent their last three days on…

A sag story:

From harmless trend to outlaw fashion Caitlin Taylor | Collegio Reporter A fashion trend where pants sag below the waist has become a legal issue that can get people kicked off airplanes, fined or even jailed. Pine Lawn, a suburb of St. Louis, Mo., outlawed the style, fining people who show too much underwear up to $100. And for the parents of minors caught with their pants down, the penalty can be up to $500 or 90 days in jail. Some Florida towns have similar laws, and the city council in Collinsville, Ill., is debating whether to follow suit. Solomon Watkins, running back for the PSU football team and junior in recreation, says that such…

Legal love:

Students give mixed reactions to same-sex marriage legalization Madison Dennis | Editor-in-Chief When Bobby Hale, nontraditional student in business, heard about New York legalizing same-sex marriage, he was thrilled. “I was very proud to be a gay person in that moment,” Hale said. New York lawmakers voted Friday, June 24, to legalize same-sex marriage, becoming the sixth and largest state to do so, joining Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont. Dani Drake, a sophomore in biology, had a markedly different reaction to the law. “I was very surprised and definitely taken aback,” Drake said. “It didn’t pass two years ago in a Democratic majority, so I was shocked that it passed with a Republican-controlled…

Sharpening the Axe

Bunnell’s vision for a better library Bartholomew Klick | Copy Editor David Bunnell has a vision for the Axe Library that goes beyond archival sciences and vast collections of books. One change he’s hoping to make would reopen the Axe Grind, the coffee shop on the first floor, whose abandoned counters still sit near the study tables. Bunnell, dean of library services, says he doesn’t want to duplicate services found across the road at the Overman Student Center, but this won’t stop him from finding something to do with the space. “We want something unique that you can’t get anywhere else,” Bunnell said. He stressed that none of his ideas for renovating the library or…

Battle of Lincoln Park

Mock battle rocks Pittsburg Caitlin Taylor | Collegio Reporter Pittsburg State University’s National Guard presented a mock battle at Lincoln Park at noon Saturday, July 3, for Pittsburg’s annual Independence Day celebration. Standing in 90-degree weather, Pittsburg residents lined the area set aside for the battle, a showdown between a group of National Guard soldiers and a smaller group of “bad guys.” Once the battle was over, children and adults flooded the pretend battlefield to collect the remnants of artillery shells to take as souvenirs. Staff Sgt. D.J. Perry, recruiting officer at Pittsburg State University, has been helping coordinate these mock battles for 10 years now. “We try to do the battle every year,” Perry…

Being evil

Google to delete child’s e-mails with grandparents Ten-year-old Alex, an avid Internet user who, according to his parents, types 50 words per minute, uses Gmail to stay in touch with his grandparents. They live in California and Scotland. Alex loves Google, and leaped headfirst into the open beta test for Google+, a service meant to compete with Twitter and Facebook. Google+ requires a date of birth to use, presumably because of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), which attempts to regulate children’s use of the Internet, and defines a child as anyone below age 13. Alex gave Google+ his real age. The next time he logged into Gmail, the account had been locked. This…

Social media, reality TV usher in new era for sports fans

Jake Faber | Sports Editor Growing up with a former college hockey player for a father, the only sport I ever watched on television as a kid was Canada’s pastime. Some kids have incredible memories of watching Adam Vinateri’s last-second 48-yard field goal against the Rams in Super Bowl XXXVI, or watching Randy Johnson pitch in game seven against the Yankees back in 2001. I don’t remember watching any of these things as a kid. And there’s a simple reason for that–because I didn’t. I simply didn’t care enough about sports when I was young to pay attention to them on television. The only memories I have of watching historic live sporting events as a…