Down to earth

Pittsburg State University prepared for the 41st Earth Day by hosting several events throughout the week. They were put on by the University Sustainability Committee and multiple student organizations. On Saturday, April 16, students and Pittsburg residents biked 12 miles to Nature Reserve and back. National Residence Hall Honorary also sponsored a highway cleanup at the junction of Highways 69 and 400. On Monday, April 18, Student Government Association sponsored a “Go for the Green” game show in Jazzman’s Café. On Tuesday, Residence Hall Assembly challenged students to tell the difference between tap, bottled and filtered water. Winners of the challenge were entered in a prize drawing. On Thursday, April 21, area high school students…

Smoking ban efforts delayed by SGA

Caitlin TaylorCollegio Reporter Student government has delayed the legislation to ban smoking from campus, and will not continue discussions about it until the fall semester.Thomas Gregory, vice president of SGA, says that the legislation has been put on hold so that the organization can revamp its strategy of getting students’ opinions and for pushing the legislation through.“We realized that it is a lot bigger of a campaign than we thought,” Gregory said. Gregory says the smoking ban committee has decided to broaden its efforts, and to involve more people and organizations on campus, and to get supporters among campus administrators, from the health center and from all of the university’s colleges. “When I took on…

Striving for self-sufficiency

Whitney Saporito Managing editor KRPS listeners responded to proposed cuts to public radio by helping the station to exceed its goal in the spring fundraising campaign, April 6 through April 16. Missi Kelly, general manager at Pittsburg State University’s KRPS, says an extra push on the final day of the campaign took the station $11,000 over its goal of $77,537. Kelly says the extra incentive came from an anonymous donor who promised to match donations two for one. “That resulted in our best day ever,” Kelly said of Saturday, when the station raised $36,128 in four hours, bringing its total to $88,769. With proposed federal and state budget cuts totaling 40 percent of KRPS’s budget,…

Big time help

Massive volunteer effort strengthens bond between town and college Alexandria Mott Collegio Reporter Saturday, April 9, marked the Big Event’s ninth year at Pittsburg State University. In 1842, Texas A&M University created the Big Event as an attempt to show the university’s gratitude to the community. The Big Event was created to be a one-day service project that shows appreciation toward the residents of the university’s community by raking leaves, cleaning gutters, washing windows, and other volunteer work The Student Government Association of Pittsburg State organizes a local Big Event every year. Tom Roudebush, sophomore in plastics engineering, says the Big Event is important for the image of the university. “By being able to put in…

Voting in SGA election ends Friday

Whitney Saporito Managing Editor The Student Government Association will soon have new leadership. SGA elections started this week Monday, April 11, and will last until Friday, April 15. Students can go online to vote by logging into GUS, clicking on the “Ballots, surveys and voter registration” tab on the left, selecting “vote on ballots and/or complete surveys,” then selecting the Student Government Association 2011 Election ballot from the drop down menu. Current President Brandon Mills and Vice President Thomas Gregory have decided to step down from their leadership roles and instead run for positions as senators. Vying to take their place are four students, all experienced in SGA. Running as the Gorilla Advancement Party candidate…

Non-teaching staff get voice in PSU affairs

Caitlin Taylor Collegio Reporter The recent formation of a senate for unclassified staff members will allow non-teaching employees, such as administrators and directors, to have a voice in PSU’s affairs. “The unclassified staff has been left out of the government structure that we have built and I have been concerned about it for a number of years,” President Steve Scott said. Scott says the new senate was formed partly because the regents have set up a statewide, unclassified council in Topeka.  Having an on-campus unclassified senate allows for the president of that senate to go to Topeka to represent the unclassified division of PSU’s staff. Misty Button, internal auditor and unclassified staffer, is one of…

‘I have epilepsy, but epilepsy doesn’t have me’

Whitney Saporito Managing Editor Imagine waking up each morning knowing you may have to depend on a stranger to save your life. For Sienna Paoni, senior in psychology, this is an everyday reality. Paoni is one of 3 million Americans living with epilepsy. The Epilepsy Foundation website defines epilepsy as a seizure disorder, caused by a brief, strong surge of electrical activity that affects part or all of the brain. There is no current cure for epilepsy and in many cases, no known cause. Still, many people with epilepsy live normal lives with the help of medication. There are several types of seizures, broken down into two categories: Partial seizures and generalized seizures. Partial seizures…

New King Cellular?

Jennifer Katzer Collegio Reporter On March 17, AT&T announced its plans to purchase T-Mobile, the smallest cellular company in the U.S. made popular by its cheap plans, in a $39 million merger. This announcement has sparked anger among consumers and competing companies alike. Sprint vowed to fight the merger on the grounds of avoiding a duopoly between Verizon and AT&T, as the new company would be nearly twice the size of Sprint, its leading competitor. Megan Goul, sophomore in nursing, says she was concerned that the 4G towers AT&T uses would make T-Mobile’s 3G towers obsolete. “I just spent $200 on my phone in October,” Goul said. “I was a little upset. But after talking…

Moving Day

Caitlin Taylor Collegio Reporter Classes in Hughes Hall are scheduled to be moved across campus from April 29 to May 13 to allow for renovations during the summer. The renovation of Hughes is a series of projects in the Master Plan that are starting to be put to action. Howard Smith, dean of the College of Education, says that he thinks this will benefit Hughes and the College of Education because the renovations will create a better environment. “It’s less intrusive in the summer than it would normally be in the spring and fall for them to do renovations,” Smith said. “The outcome will be a greater benefit than the slight inconvenience.” Smith says the…

Reading, writing, citizenship

Are poor results on civics tests the symptom of a deeper problem? Todd Miller Collegio Writer In an unofficial test about U.S. politics and history conducted in the U-club of the Overman Student Center, 20 percent of PSU students failed. The lowest two scores were five correct responses. Two of the 10 students quizzed managed to answer all their questions perfectly. The group averaged a 76 percent, which is 16 percent higher than the passing requirement. Most of the students did better on questions of history, while many lacked knowledge on the inner workings of the government. The questions answered correctly most often were those about geography, symbols and holidays. Tyler Stillwell, senior of visual…